encyclopedia

Rosehip Oil

Natural Sources:
Mosqueta rose, Rosa rubiginosa L. [Fam. Rosaceae]

Forms:
Rosehip oil extract; natural trans-retinoic acid (tretenoin) extract from rosehips.

Therapeutic Uses:
– Acne

– Antioxidant

– Age Spots (skin)

– Burns

– Cold Sores

– Dermatitis

– Diabetic Skin Ulcers

– Eczema

– Hyperpigmentation

– Infection

– Psoriasis

– Scar Healing

– Skin Disorders

– Skin Ulcers

– Surgical Wounds

– Ulcers (external non-healing)

– Vitiligo

– Wounds

– Wrinkles

Overview:

The oil of Mosqueta rose (Rosa rubiginosa L.) [Fam. Rosaceae] is rich in Tretinoin (all-trans-retinoic acid), known for its powerful skin healing properties. The unique healing properties of this oil were first discovered 1983 by the Faculty of Chemistry and Pharmacology at the University of Concepcion in Chile. A two-year study focused on the healing action of the oil applied to 180 patients with surgical, traumatic and post-burning scars, as well as to a group suffering from premature aging. The results were remarkable. It was found that Rosa Mosqueta Oil produced an effective regenerative action on the skin. Continuous application of this oil effectively helped in attenuating scars and wrinkles, in preventing advancement of premature aging, and in regaining lost skin color and tone. Since then, numerous studies on Rosa Mosqueta Oil have been completed at various universities in Chile and other countries. Today, Rosa Mosqueta Oil is exported from Chile in large quantities. Annual sales exceeded US$30 million in one recent year, and the oil is used worldwide by the medical community and as an important active ingredient by many cosmetic companies in Asia, Europe, North America and Latin America. The positive action of Rosa Mosqueta Oil in helping to regenerate damaged skin was originally attributed to its high content of unsaturated and essential fatty acids including oleic (15-20%), linoleic (44-50%) and linolenic (30-35%). However, researchers soon identified the presence of Trans-Retinoic acid as the component responsible for the remarkable pharmacological properties of Rosa Mosqueta Oil. Trans-Retinoic acid is a derivative of Retinol (Vitamin A) called Tretinoin. The therapeutic effects of topical Tretinoin have been well researched and recognized for almost 30 years. Rosa Mosqueta Oil is a safer natural alternative to synthetic Tretinoin and can be applied to treat skin ulcers, fine wrinkles, mottled hyperpigmentation and skin roughness.

Chemistry:
Oil of the rose of mosqueta (Rosa rubiginosa L.) contains oleic acid (20%), linoleic acid (41%) and linolenic acid (39%), trans retinoic acid, red and yellow pigments, especially carotenoids, mainly different isomers of rubixanthin, lycopene, beta-carotene, beta-chryptoxanthin, zeaxanthin and lutein. Rosehip seeds contain: Up to 10% fixed oil; up to 0.3% essential oil; traces of vitamin C; and inorganic substances.

Suggested Amount:
Rosa Mosqueta Oil can be applied directly to wounds or can be used in cream formulations for skin healing.

Drug Interactions:
None known.

Contraindications:
None known.

Side Effects:
None known.

References:

Brown SK, Heilman ER. 2002. Granular parakeratosis: Resolution with topical tretinoin. J Am Acad Dermatol 2002 Nov; 47(5 Suppl): S279-80.

Gupta AK, Lynde CW, Kunynetz RA, Amin S, Choi K, Goldstein E. 2002. A Randomized, Double-Blind, Multicenter, Parallel Group Study to Compare Relative Efficacies of the Topical Gels 3% Erythromycin/5% Benzoyl Peroxide and 0.025% Tretinoin/Erythromycin 4% in the Treatment of Moderate Acne Vulgaris of the Face. J Cutan Med Surg 2002 Oct 9; [epub ahead of print].

Hornero-Mendez D, Minguez-Mosquera MI. 2000. Carotenoid pigments in Rosa mosqueta hips, an alternative carotenoid source for foods. J Agric Food Chem. 2000 Mar; 48(3): 825-8.

Moreno Gimenez JC, Bueno J, Navas J, Camacho F. 1990. [Treatment of skin ulcer using oil of mosqueta rose]. Med Cutan Ibero Lat Am 1990; 18(1): 63-6. [Article in Spanish].

Nyirady J, Grossman RM, Nighland M, Berger RS, Jorizzo JL, Kim YH, Martin AG, Pandya AG, Schulz KK, Strauss JS. 2001. A comparative trial of two retinoids commonly used in the treatment of acne vulgaris. J Dermatolog Treat 2001 Sep; 12(3): 149-57.

Additional Information:

Positive Clinical Results:

Ten patients affected with leg ulcers and post-surgical wounds were treated by 26% oil concentrated with rose of mosqueta with very notable improvement in healing compared with the control group. Due to the lack of side effects, researchers concluded that rose of mosqueta oil is very useful for treating leg ulcers and other skin disorders.

Rosa Mosqueta Oil and Tretinoin for Treating Skin Sun Damage:

The most significant results with Rosa Mosqueta Oil have been found in the treatment of skin damaged by excessive exposure to sunlight (photo-aging damage, otherwise called dermatoheliosis). In fact, the only product approved by the FDA for the treatment of photodamage (fine wrinkles, mottled hyperpigmentation, and skin roughness), is topical Tretinoin emollient cream that may also help prevent additional photoaging when it is used to treat existing photoaging. Tretinoin can produce quick and positive changes in the skin. However, because it is a very strong substance, it must be applied with medical supervision. Rosa Mosqueta Oil produces the benefits of Tretinoin but without side effects because the Trans-Retinoic Acid contained in it is in a natural state as part of a complex system of fatty acids. The action of Rosa Mosqueta Oil is controlled and slowly released by nature, eliminating the risk of overdoses. Sun damage to skin includes surface wrinkles, keratosis and variation in the distribution of melanin pigments in the skin. Studies have shown that among people who get high sun exposure during three months of the summer, Rosa Mosqueta Oil significantly reduces surface wrinkles within one week and almost eliminates patchy skin spots from uneven tanning.

Rosa Mosqueta Oil Research:

Moreno Gimenez JC, Bueno J, Navas J, Camacho F. 1990. [Treatment of skin ulcer using oil of mosqueta rose]. Med Cutan Ibero Lat Am 1990; 18(1): 63-6. [Article in Spanish]

Departamento de Dermatologia Medico-Quirurgica y Venereologia, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Sevilla.

Oil rose of mosqueta (Rosa aff. Rubiginosa L.) is a concentrated solution in linoleic (41%) and linolenic acid (39%), that offers benefit therapeutic effects in the wound healing. Ten patients affected of leg ulcers and post-surgical wounds were treated by 26% oil concentrated rose of mosqueta with very notable improvement on its healing compared with the control group. Due to the lack of side effects, we believe rose of mosqueta oil is very usefull to these conditions. Mechanism of actions and others indications are discussed.

Hornero-Mendez D, Minguez-Mosquera MI. 2000. Carotenoid pigments in Rosa mosqueta hips, an alternative carotenoid source for foods. J Agric Food Chem. 2000 Mar; 48(3): 825-8.

Departamento de Biotecnologia de Alimentos, Instituto de la Grasa (CSIC), Avenida Padre Garcia Tejero 4, 41012 Sevilla, Spain. hornero@cica.es

Carotenoid composition has been investigated in Rosa mosqueta hips (Rosa rubiginosa, Rosa eglanteria). Six major carotenoids were identified (beta-carotene, lycopene, rubixanthin, gazaniaxanthin, beta-cryptoxanthin, and zeaxanthin) together with other minor carotenoids (violaxanthin, antheraxanthin, and gamma-carotene). An average composition has been estimated as follows: beta-carotene (497.6 mg/kg of dry wt), lycopene (391.9 mg/kg of dry wt), rubixanthin (703.7 mg/kg of dry wt), gazaniaxanthin (289.2 mg/kg of dry wt), beta-cryptoxanthin (183.5 mg/kg of dry wt), zeaxanthin (266. 6 mg/kg of dry wt), and minor carotenoids (67.1 mg/kg of dry wt). Possible uses in food technology are outlined and discussed including the preparation of highly colored oleoresins as natural colorants of food and beverages and as provitamin A sources.

Brown SK, Heilman ER. 2002. Granular parakeratosis: Resolution with topical tretinoin. J Am Acad Dermatol 2002 Nov; 47(5 Suppl): S279-80.

Section of Dermatology, University of Chicago, and Department of Dermatology, State University of New York Health Science Center at Brooklyn.

Granular parakeratosis is an unusual acquired dermatosis characterized by intertriginous keratotic papules. Histologic examination shows parakeratosis with large numbers of basophilic keratohyaline granules within the stratum corneum. We report a case of a granular parakeratosis of the axilla that cleared rapidly with topical administration of tretinoin.

Nyirady J, Grossman RM, Nighland M, Berger RS, Jorizzo JL, Kim YH, Martin AG, Pandya AG, Schulz KK, Strauss JS. 2001. A comparative trial of two retinoids commonly used in the treatment of acne vulgaris. J Dermatolog Treat 2001 Sep; 12(3): 149-57.

Johnson and Johnson Consumer Products Worldwide, Skillman, NJ 08558, USA. jnyirad@cpcus.jnj.com

BACKGROUND: Topical retinoids are highly effective treatments for acne vulgaris. The various formulations and concentrations available allow physicians to tailor therapies to individual patient’s needs and minimize the cutaneous irritation that is often observed with the use of these drugs.

OBJECTIVE: To compare the efficacy and safety of tretinoin gel microsphere 0.1% with adapalene gel 0.1% in the treatment of acne vulgaris.

METHODS: A 12-week double-blind study was conducted, and patients were evaluated at baseline and at weeks 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12.

RESULTS: Although the two drugs displayed similar efficacy in the resolution of acne lesions at 12 weeks, a significantly greater reduction in the number of comedones was seen at week 4 among patients treated with tretinoin gel microsphere (p = 0.047). Patients receiving tretinoin gel microsphere had an increased incidence of dryness (weeks 8 and 10) and peeling (weeks 3, 6, 8, and 10) compared with those patients treated with adapalene gel, but the two groups were comparable with respect to erythema, burning/stinging, and itching.

CONCLUSION: Both drugs have similar efficacy in the resolution of acne lesions but tretinoin gel microsphere may result in a faster onset of action in the reduction of comedones compared to adapalene.

Sarkar R, Kaur C, Bhalla M, Kanwar AJ. 2002. The combination of glycolic Acid peels with a topical regimen in the treatment of melasma in dark-skinned patients: a comparative study. Dermatol Surg 2002 Sep; 28(9): 828-32.

Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Government Medical College and Hospital, Chandigarh, India.

BACKGROUND: Melasma continues to be a difficult condition to treat, especially in dark-skinned patients, although various topical modalities including hydroquinone, tretinoin, and/or topical steroids have been used singly or in combination with variable results.

OBJECTIVE: To determine if serial glycolic acid peels provide additional improvement when combined with a time-tested topical regimen, a modification of Kligman’s formula (hydroquinone 5%, tretinoin 0.05%, hydrocortisone acetate 1% in a cream base). All cases had epidermal melasma as detected by Wood’s light examination.

METHODS: Forty Indian melasma patients were divided into two groups of 20 each. One group received serial glycolic acid peel combined with a topical regimen, modified Kligman’s formula. The other, a control group, received only modified Kligman’s formula. The results were evaluated by a clinical investigator both subjectively and with photographs taken at baseline, 12 (before the fourth peel), and 21 (3 weeks after the sixth peel) weeks. For clinical evaluation, the Melasma Area and Severity Index (MASI) was used.

RESULTS: A significant decrease in the MASI score from baseline to 21 weeks was observed in both groups (P <.001). The group receiving the glycolic acid peels showed a trend toward more rapid and greater improvement, with statistically significant results (P <.001). Only a few side effects were observed in the peel group. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that serial glycolic acid peels provide an additional effect to a topical regimen which is a modification of the time-tested Kligman's regimen for treating melasma in dark-complexioned individuals if used judiciously and under supervision. It demonstrates that superficial chemical peels are beneficial in the treatment of melasma. Cohen AD, Chetov T, Cagnano E, Naimer S, Vardy DA. 2001. Treatment of multiple miliary osteoma cutis of the face with local application of tretinoin (all-trans-retinoic acid): a case report and review of the literature. J Dermatolog Treat 2001 Sep; 12(3): 171-3. Dermatology Institute Clalit Health Services, Beer-Sheva, Israel. arcohen@bgumail.bgu.ac.il BACKGROUND: Multiple miliary osteoma cutis of the face represents primary extra-skeletal bone formation that arises within the skin of the face. METHODS: A 60-year-old woman with multiple miliary osteoma cutis of the face was treated by application of 0.05% tretinoin (all-trans-retinoic acid) cream nightly. RESULTS: After 3 months of therapy there were fewer papules and a decrease in size of remaining lesions. In a literature search, it was found that local application of tretinoin was successful and achieved a decrease in the number of papules over the face in all patients with multiple miliary osteoma cutis of the face; however, the length of time to achieve response varied from a few weeks to 6 months. CONCLUSION: It is suggested that local application of tretinoin cream should be considered in the therapy of multiple miliary osteoma cutis of the face, particularly when the lesions are small and superficial.